East Coast Islands & Rainforests


11 nights

£5429

Introductions
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East Coast Islands & Rainforests

Visit East Coast Islands and Rainforest on this 12 Day tour from Sydney to Cairns.


11 nights

from £5429

Description

Explore the epic Eastern Australia coastline on a journey that takes you from buzzy cosmopolitan Sydney to the glamorous Gold Coast. Cruise to pristine Fraser Island and the Whitsundays, and head to tropical Cairns to discover the world-renowned Great Barrier Reef. There are hinterland experiences too – you’ll taste premium wines in the Hunter Valley and tour a remote Rockhampton cattle station.

Highlights
  • Choose your own adventure on the Gold Coast: perhaps taste a new cuisine or hike out to a waterfall!
  • Spend two nights on incredible Fraser Island, then enjoy a day out further north, on the Great Barrier Reef.
Additional Information

Flight Information
Any flights referred to in the itinerary are at the client’s expense and are not included in the land content price.
Day Prior - Flights to arrive anytime into Sydney Airport
Day 12 - Flights to depart anytime from Cairns Airport

*2022/ 2023 Departure Dates 1-Apr-21 to 31-Mar-22: Advanced Booking - Itinerary, dates, prices subject to change.

Pricing
Jul 2024
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Description

Sydney – Coffs Harbour

As this holiday departs at 7.30am from Rydges Sydney Central, accommodation will need to be pre-booked for the previous night.

Start discovering the landscapes of Australia’s east coast as you travel northward to the coastal town of Coffs Harbour.  From your accommodation nestled amongst sprawling tropical gardens, you’ll have the opportunity to wander down to Little Diggers Beach and Diggers Head. Enjoy the early evening sea breeze just like the locals do. Tonight enjoy a Welcome Reception and dinner with your Travel Director

BREAKFREE AANUKA BEACH RESORT

Welcome to BreakFree Aanuka Beach Resort, an absolute beachfront tropical style resort ideal for families and couples at Coffs Harbour on the NSW North Coast. At BreakFree Aanuka Beach Resort Coffs Harbour you can expect great accommodation, recreation and relaxation rolled into one.

Meals Included: D

DESTINATION

Coffs Harbour

The friendly beachside city of Coffs Harbour is Coffs Coast’s vibrant heart and is surrounded by National Parks.  

It faces the Solitary Islands Marine Park and the natural environment and uncrowded beaches are complemented by exciting activities and attractions, excellent shopping, fantastic accommodation and award-winning cafés and restaurants. Holidays to Coffs Harbour are popular amongst Australians and international visitors alike.

It faces the Solitary Islands Marine Park and the natural environment and uncrowded beaches are complemented by exciting activities and attractions, excellent shopping, fantastic accommodation and award-winning cafés and restaurants. Holidays to Coffs Harbour are popular amongst Australians and international visitors alike.

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Coffs Harbour sits in a unique position where the Great Dividing Range meets the Australian East Coast. The subtropical city lies between the forested hills and sparkling blue waters. Coffs Harbour is a modern city with a small-town atmosphere – and the hub from which to explore Coffs Coast’s enormous selection of things to see and do.

Those on Coffs Harbour holidays will find the City Centre’s unique shops and boutiques, al fresco cafés and the Thursday Growers’ Market are popular with office workers, regular shoppers and visitors alike.

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The popular Jetty and Harbourside district is a few kilometres to the east along Harbour Drive, just past The Promenade with its shops and restaurants overlooking Coffs Creek. A holiday in Coffs Harbour would be incomplete without a visit to the ‘Jetty Strip’ opposite the Jetty Village Shopping Centre features around 15 cafés and restaurants offering indoor and al-fresco dining.

 

Make the most of your Coffs Harbour holiday and take a stroll along the Jetty foreshores, the historic Jetty itself, the Marina and the North Wall breakwall and admire the scenic harbour views. The hilly island dominating this view is Muttonbird Island Nature Reserve, home to thousands of wedge-tailed shearwaters. Its walking track offers exceptional views back to Coffs Harbour.

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Many places to stay are located in the Park Beach area, just across Coffs Creek from the Jetty area, while a string of resorts are found a few kilometres north again. Park Beach is also where you’ll find Park Beach Plaza, the region’s largest shopping mall.

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A visit to Coffs Harbour is paradise for kids, who won’t be able to decide whether to go surfing, swimming, fishing, go-karting or going to Coffs Coast’s many popular attractions. With literally hundreds of wonderful things to do and see in and around Coffs Harbour, this page is only your start to discovering Coffs Coast.

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During the months of January to April it is regarded at the wet season as you can expect to encounter many nights with constant showers. The occasion afternoon thunderstorm often sees the end to a hot humid day just so it can cool things off so you can enjoy a relaxing evening. Between April and July the rain seems to dissipate as the air can become dry and days can become humid with no rain in sight.

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The dry season in Coffs Harbour is between the months of July through to September, and if you are planning a holiday during these months you will experience blue clear skies, light crisp winds and perfect sunny weather. Just the best climate for you to get out and about and enjoy all that this wonderful city has to offer!

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September through to early October is classed as the “false” summer and then from November the rain season sets in again with humid conditions really heating things up for everyone. But the days are never too hot to do anything as the cooling sea breezes make every activities enjoyable.

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A delightful Garden Café is open at the Botanic Garden from 11am to 3pm on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and from 1pm to 3pm on Sunday. Meet your friends at the Gardens for coffee and cake or a light lunch amid the trees.

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There are picnic areas located close to the entrance, and on the Creek bank. The Garden has an extensive wheelchair accessible well signposted pathway system, with seating every 100 metres, and toilets at both the southern (entrance), and northern ends. Located in the Information Centre, the Garden Shop has soft drinks, ice-creams, cards, plants and souvenirs available. 

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The grassed areas close to the entrance are ideal for picnics. For a picnic with a difference, sit between a lily pond and fountain, or a glasshouse and sensory garden. There are open spaces for larger groups and secluded areas for that special occasion.

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The Prime Display Area as you enter is a miniature window to the Garden with its pergolas, water feature, colourful flowering native and exotic plants is ideal for those who want to enjoy a short walk in an area of great beauty. As you enter the Garden the water feature displays a range of colourful water lilies, surrounding a Tropical African bottle palm.  Several of the paths are covered by pergolas, with cascading flowers from vines from all over the world.

 

The Mangrove Boardwalk provides interpretive information describing the plant and animal communities, and some of their unique adaptations to the estuarine environment. The Waterwise Garden demonstrates how quality landscaping, good design, soil improvement, suitable species, correct planting and the application of mulches will ensure that the garden is functional and conserves water and protects the environment.

For those who have an hour to spend there is the opportunity to enjoy the sensory garden, the glasshouses, and beautiful plantings from areas in Africa, China, India, Japan and the Americas that have similar climates to Coffs Harbour.

 

Interested in the environment--the Nature Trail, the Aboriginal Pants Walk and the Rainforest walk have interpretive signage. 

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A variety of waders and water birds can be seen from the Mangrove Boardwalk Bird Hide, and over 150 species of birds have been recorded in the Garden.


 

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The marina break wall now joins the mainland to the once isolated Muttonbird Island. This allows pedestrian access to viewing platforms at the top and eastern end of the island. From the top the panorama is 360 degrees - ocean, islands, marina and mountains. At the eastern end, the scene is of rocky coast, harbour entrance and the Pacific horizon.

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At the entrance to the Jetty precinct on Harbour Drive is the Jetty Strip. It is a collection of cafes, restaurants, a pub, gallery, dive and surf shops. On most days the tables outside the cafes are busy with people enjoying coffee or a meal. At lunch and dinner times, people stroll past the restaurants deciding  which to choose; Italian, Indian, Thai, Vietnamese, Indian, seafood, pub bistro or Mod Oz. Which will you choose?

 

 

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During summer school holidays, 'sideshow  alley' is in full swing near the entrance to the timber jetty. There's the thrills, spills and sweets of the merry-go-round, slippery slides, gee whiz and fairy floss. All the fun of the fair.

And there's an outdoor cinema too at this time of the year. You sit under the stars, on a blanket or on your deck chair and watch a movie with locals and visitors from around Australia and the world.

No matter what time of the year you visit, the Jetty Strip and Coffs Harbour Marina is always alive with activity. Come and see it for yourself.


 

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But whenever you visit Point Lookout, the atmosphere is magical and the views forever. As you look east, there is row upon row of ridges and forest clad ranges. On crisp mornings the valleys  are filled with mist and cloud, sometimes swirling sometimes stationary. At sunrise, the sounds of birdlife from the lower levels herald the start of a new day. Then when the sun rises, its rays rise over the distant Pacific horizon to the heights of Coffs Coast.

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At Point Lookout, there are numerous walking tracks to explore. Some take you below the lookout across the face of the escarpment, while others venture all the way down to the valley below. The Eagles Nest Track, Lyrebird Walk and the Tee Tree Falls Walk are between one hour and one days duration. Depending on which you take, you will see Snow Gums, Antarctic Beech, craggy cliff faces, waterfalls, alpine grasses and mossy heath.

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Along the way keep an eye out for shy  among the forest understory and Wedge-tail eagles roaring high on up-currents of wind along the cliff edges. If you are quiet and lady Luck is on your side you may even see a Spotted Quoll, one of Australia's endangered wildlife species.

At Point Lookout you can camp in the National Park camping ground, Thungutti. The alternative is beside the Styx River just outside the park boundary. Both offer basic facilities. 

 

Point Lookout is in the New England National Park. To get there take the Waterfall Way via Bellingen, Dorrigo and Ebor. The turn off into the Park is near Dutton's Trout Hatchery. From the turnoff it is 15 kms (11 on unsealed road) to the lookout. Enjoy the view.

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On warmer weekends, Never Never Creek is a popular spot for families, couples and groups of friends enjoying a picnic and a swim or just a stroll around the shallow parts of the crystal clear river.

There are places along the river where people park their cars to roll out their picnic blanket or take a dip. One spot that’s easy to locate and access is Arthur Keough Park. This is on the north bank of the Never Never Creek, just after Gleniffer Road becomes Promised Land Road.

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Make sure you bring everything you need, as there are no shops nearby. A towel and your swimmers are a must, because even if you hadn’t planned to go in, one look at the clear, refreshing water will make anyone want to get at least their feet wet. 

If you’re keen to see more, bring your boots and go for a walk through the bush along the creek. Several deeper swimming holes are a bit further up-stream. 

 

The quickest and probably most popular way to admire the breathtaking landscape is to take a drive along Promised Land Loop by following the Promised Land Road.  Numerous stunning properties can be marvelled at along the way.

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South Solitary Lighthouse was designed by James Barnet. The lighthouse went to tender in 28 June 1878 and John McLeod and his partner Hugh MacMaster, were the successful tenders. The first group of workmen arrived on the island on 11 July 1878 and this is the first known habitation of the island. “Barnet had expected the lighthouse to be in commission in 1879 and the monogrammed date 18VR79 which appears on the lighthouse entrance and also on the keeper’s quarters, was included in Barnet’s elevation plan of January 1878. The light in fact did not operate until 18 March 1880.” (JRC Planning Services, 1996:p26).

 

The tower was built of mass concrete using cement and sand conveyed to the island and 'broken stone from the conglomerate rock of the island.' Three large stone cottages were erected for the keepers and due to the extreme weather conditions are surrounded by high stone walls. A wall also runs from the cottages to the lighthouse.

 

The South Solitary Lighthouse appears to be the first in New South Wales to use kerosene instead of colza oil. The mechanism was so satisfactory that it was not converted to automatic electric until 1975 when it was demanned. Therefore the South Solitary Lighthouse was also the last kerosene operated light it New South Wales. The original optic was replaced in 1975 and the 1880 optic can still be seen in the Coffs Harbour and District Historical Museum.

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In the early days supplies arrived by steamer from Sydney every fortnight and eventually weekly or fortnightly supplies were launched from Coffs Harbour, weather permitting. Due to the steep slope of the island, everything including supplies and people had to be taken off the launch in a basket lowered by a crane from the landing stage. The drums of kerosene had to be unloaded and then hauled up the steep concrete path as with the other stores. 

There is a little school house, a room, near the head-keeper's residence on the island. In 1909 the keepers hired a school-teacher William Mahon and arranged for a government subsidy for the year that Mahon remained on the island. In the early days a governess was engaged by many of the keepers. Children of school age later received their education through correspondence.


 

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Diggers Beach is renowned for its waves by the local surfers. It is a popular spot with both locals and visitors. If you've always wanted to learn to surf, Diggers Beach is a great place for the whole family to get the skills with the help of expert instructors. Diggers Beach Reserve offers a playground, electric barbeques, picnic shelters, two viewing platforms and beach showers.

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Park Beach, Coffs Harbour's main surf beach is the home of the Coffs Harbour Surf Life Saving Club. Park Beach is a popular area for water sports, fishermen, and surfers. Swimmers should be aware Park Beach can be prone to strong rips particularly at the creek mouth. Park Beach is within close proximity to camping facilities, hotel and motel accommodation, cafes, restaurants and the local shopping facilities. Adjacent to the beach carpark is Park Beach Reserve, which is on the banks of Coffs Creek. The reserve is a popular family area for both visitors and locals. Park Beach Reserve boasts many facilities such as BBQ's, picnic tables, children's play areas, shady trees and toilet facilities.

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Sawtell Beach lies along the village of Sawtell, and is a popular surf, swimming and fishing beach. The headlands are popular for watching the migrating whales and taking in the incredible coastline views. At the southern end of Sawtell Beach you will find Sailors Bay, an area sheltered by a small island which can be reached at low tide. Here you will find a boat launching ramp, nearby parking, and tidal rock pools.

Sawtell itself boasts an abundance of cafes, boutique clothes shops, a variety of restaurants, reserves, BBQ facilities, showers, toilets, popular picnic areas, children's playgrounds and a variety of accommodation facilities all within close walking distance to the main beach.

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The sweeping bay of Woolgoolga Beach stretches from the picturesque picnic spot of Woolgoolga Lake to the headland above the town. Immediately behind the southern end is the reserve with a playground, electric bbqs, picnic shelters, toilets/changeroom, beach shower and a boat ramp. A mere surfboard's length away are Woolgoolga's shops, cafes and restaurants.

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Sapphire Beach is just north of Coffs Harbour. Access to the beach is through the village of Sapphire, via Crystal Waters drive, which offers playground facilities, parking, beach showers and shops.

Emerald Beach boasts a range of facilities including, childrens playground, electric barbeques, picnics shelters, toilets, beach showers, a boat ramp and it is close to the shops. Emerald's main shopping area runs down towards the beach.

 At the northern-most edge of the Coffs Coast are Corindi and Arrawarra Beaches. At Arrawarra Headland Reserve there are picnic tables, toilets, a beach shower and gravel boat ramps.

Corindi Beach is great for surfing, swimming and snorkelling, but there are plenty of rockpools for young children to explore. It also boasts the Yarrawarra Aboriginal Corporation's arts centre and bush tucker walk.

 

And, if you get bored of the sun, sand and surf, a boardwalk accessible from the northern end of Corindi Beach takes you through rare, coastal rainforest.

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Muttonbird Island, connected to the land and the Coffs Harbour International Marina via a breakwater, features in many photos of Coffs Harbour. It is a unique place for many reasons and you can’t come to Coffs without going to Muttonbird Island at least once. A sacred and very significant site to the local Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal people, who call the island Giidayn Miirral, the island is a protected Nature Reserve and home to thousands of wedge-tailed shearwaters, also known as muttonbirds. (Read more about the birds in the Wildlife section).

 

On top of the island, you’ll have an incredible 360-degree view across the ocean, beaches, harbour and marina, the city and the mountains. A paved walkway (1km return, with some steep sections) leads you across the island to a lookout platform on the other side. Migratory humpback whales can be seen from June to November. Don’t forget your camera!

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Perched on a ridge just above Coffs Harbour at an elevation of 310 metres, Sealy Lookout provides an expansive view over the city and south along the coastline to Sawtell. It gives you a great idea of the layout of Coffs Harbour. The lookout is located in Bruxner Park Flora Reserve, a 407ha reserve of dense rainforest and eucalypt forest in Orara East State Forest. Combine it with a picnic or bushwalk (see Bushwalks section). To get there, turn west off the Pacific Highway 1km north of the Big Banana and follow the 5km winding road up the hill through banana plantations and avocado groves to The Gap parking area, then turn left and drive a further 2km to the Lookout. Note: Sealy Lookout is closed between June and early September 2011 for the building of a new viewing platform.

 

 

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This headland at Emerald Beach, about 15km north of Coffs Harbour, is part of Moonee Beach Nature Reserve. A short loop trail takes you up and around the headland, which is a significant Aboriginal site. It offers great views over the ocean, South Solitary Island with its lighthouse, deserted Moonee Beach, the village of Emerald Beach and Mount Coramba and surrounding mountains out west. You’re likely to come across the headland’s resident eastern grey kangaroos which can often be seen grazing, resting or hopping around the headland and you may spot migrating humpback whales between June and November. To get there, turn east off the Pacific Highway at Emerald Beach and from Fiddaman Road, turn right at Dammerel Crescent to the carpark at the foot of the headland.

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Just outside the Rainforest Centre at Dorrigo National Park is the Skywalk, a 70-metre long platform that stands 21 metres over the top of the rainforest canopy. From here, at an altitude of about 760m above sea level, you’ll be able to take in the spectacular views of the subtropical rainforest below, sweeping vistas over the Bellinger Valley all the way to the coast and the Pacific Ocean on clear days. Dorrigo National Park, which also offers great bushwalks and lets you experience wildlife up close, is located 4km east of Dorrigo and one hour’s drive west of Coffs Harbour. There’s also a gift shop, interpretation centre and café.

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This lookout on the other side of the Waterfall Way from Dorrigo National Park offers some of the most superb views on the Coffs Coast. From Griffiths Lookout you’ll enjoy breathtaking wilderness views of the Great Dividing Range unfolding before you looking south. To the east, you’ll see the Pacific Ocean and on clear days, right down to Kempsey some 100km away. Located among farms, the lookout point has an interesting interpretive display sign and picnic tables. From Waterfall Way, turn into Maynard Plans Road near the Lookout Motor Inn and after 1km you’ll see a sign on the left pointing to Griffiths Lookout, which is another 4km further to the end of the road.

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Two kilometres north of Dorrigo town centre is Dangar Falls, a beautiful 30-metre waterfall set amidst scenic agricultural and dairy farmland. There’s a car park, a viewing platform, picnic tables and a walking trail that leads you to the river at the bottom of the waterfall. The viewing platform offers a great vantage point and excellent photo opportunity of the falls. Dangar Falls is signposted from Dorrigo town.

 

 

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Even more elaborate waterfalls can be found some 55km north of Dorrigo, just west of the village of Ebor. At Ebor Falls, 1300 metres above sea level, the Guy Fawkes River drops 115m over columned basalt rock. There are three viewing platform, barbecues, picnic tables, running water and toilets for your convenience. From the carpark and upper viewing platform, a 600-metre walk along the escarpment takes you to the second viewing platform from where you have an excellent view of both the upper and lower drops of the falls and the wilderness area of Guy Fawkes National Park. A third viewing platform is just 20 metres away for a great view west. Ebor Falls is located 2km outside of Ebor on the Waterfall Way between Dorrigo and Armidale.

 

 

 

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If you’re on this longer trip along the Waterfall Way, it’s worth driving another 20 kilometres to the top of Point Lookout in New England National Park. At 1564, this is one of the highest points in New South Wales. Make sure you bring a jacket and your camera. There’s a short walk around the top where you’ll be rewarded with spectacular wilderness views to the east, south and west. Often, you’ll see the tops of the mountain ranges peeking out above the clouds and mysterious mists drifting across the valleys of the Great Escarpment. There is a picnic shelter with an open fire place and some great walking tracks. Access to Point Lookout from Waterfall Way is via an unpaved road.

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All along Coffs Coast, there are plenty of headlands that offer incredible views of the coast and the Pacific Ocean. All are great for whale watching between June and November. Here are a few to consider, all very accessible with car parking nearby and a path across the headland: Woolgoolga Headland in the northern seaside town of Woolgoolga, Macauleys Headland between Park Beach and Diggers Beach in Coffs Harbour, Boambee Headland and Sawtell Headland to the south and north of Sawtell Beach and the village of Sawtell, and Hungry Head just south of Urunga, where you’re also likely to spot grey kangaroos.

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About 20km south of Coffs Harbour is a picturesque creek-side picnic area, nestled in the heart of Bongil Bongil National Park. Bonville Creek is ideal for kayaking, canoeing and fishing, and you may go for a wander along the park’s trails. The picnic area has barbecue facilities, a large undercover area, open tables and plenty of grass. Access the park by turning east off the Pacific Highway into Williams Road at Bonville.

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The village of Mylestom is wedged on a narrow strip of land between the Pacific Ocean and the Bellinger River. Take the scenic drive south from Repton following the broad river and park at the southern end of River Street or just around the corner between the general store/fish & chips shop and the park on George Street. The park has a children’s playground, picnic tables and toilet facilities. More picnic tables are found on a strip of grass right along the beautiful, deep-blue river. You’ll enjoy the most stunning, expansive views over the water towards the mountains. Bring your swimmers or a fishing rod and don’t forget your camera.

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Urunga is the place where the Kalang and Bellinger Rivers meet each other and flow into the ocean. Adjacent to the rivers’ estuary is Morgo Street Reserve where you can enjoy the picnic you brought or something you’ve bought from some of the little shops or cafés in the compact town centre just a stone’s throw away. There are picnic tables, toilet facilities and plenty of parking. Make sure to walk through or around the holiday park and take a stroll along the scenic 600m boardwalk that runs through the estuary to the sea. Keep an eye out for fish, crabs and other shellfish in the shallow waters and you’ll also see a variety of waterbirds. The boardwalk has interpretive panels about the area’s history and local flora and fauna.

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When you’re in Bellingen, a great spot for a leisurely picnic is Jarrett Park along the Bellinger River, adjacent to the bridge over the river in the centre of town. Or cross the bridge and find a spot on the grass on the opposite side of the river. Bring a blanket and a selection of delicious morsels from some of the cafés, bakeries or organic produce stores in nearby Hyde or Church Streets and you’re all set. If it’s warm, why not take a refreshing dip in the river to cool off?

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One of the most magical places for a secluded picnic is the Never Never River in an area called Promised Land near Glennifer, a 10-minute drive north from Bellingen. Park your car at Arthur Keough Park on the north bank of the Never Never River and roll out your picnic blanket anywhere on the pebbles or grass beside the water. You won’t be able to resist taking off your shoes and wading around the shallow parts of the crystal clear river. The cool, pure water is great for a swim too on a hot summer’s day, so don’t forget to pack your swimmers.

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There is a variety of picnic spots to choose from in the Dorrigo National Park . You could use the picnic table right outside the Dorrigo Rainforest Centre, but just 1km down the road (or via a walking track) is The Glade Picnic Area with picnic tables, toilet facilities, and easy access to several short rainforest trails. A scenic 10km drive further along (unsealed) Dome Road will bring you to a more remote spot, the Never Never Picnic Area, the starting point of a few longer bushwalks. In all of these spots, you’ll find yourself immersed in an extraordinary subtropical rainforest environment. Bring your own refreshments or stop at the Rainforest Centre’s Canopy Café along the way.

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The seaside town of Woolgoolga has a wonderful beachside reserve at the end of Beach Street, adjacent to the caravan park. Just opposite the road from the shops, you’ll find picnic tables, shelters, toilet and shower facilities and immediate access to the beach. Or park at the end of Ocean Street and find a sheltered spot on Woolgoolga Headland for a picnic with the most amazing ocean views. Look out for migrating humpback whales between June and November.

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Just west of Woolgoolga in Sherwood Nature Reserve is the Woolgoolga Creek picnic area. Sheltered picnic tables are available on an open spot between the trees where you can picnic or enjoy a barbecue. From the picnic area, a 1.5km trail leads you through the rainforest along the creek to a pretty waterfall. From the Pacific Highway at Woolgoolga, turn west into Woolgoolga Creek Road and drive 3km to reach the picnic area.

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Coffs Coast’s northernmost village is quiet and picturesque Red Rock, a good half hour’s drive north of Coffs Harbour. Situated at the southern end of Yuraygir National Park, the village is nestled on the estuary of the pristine Red Rock River. The recreation reserve around the mouth of the river is a deservedly popular destination for picnics and as a base from which to go swimming, snorkelling or playing on the grass or sandy shores at low tide. Facilities include a caravan park and general/take-away shop, boat ramp, benches and picnic tables, amenities block and children’s playground. Don’t miss the 800m boardwalk that loops around through the mangroves just west of the boat ramp. It’ll show you some unique vegetation and a variety of interesting shorebirds.

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A very beautiful, secluded picnic spot, for which you’ll need a 4WD to get there, is Bindarray Picnic Area in Bindarri National Park, 20km west of Coffs Harbour. ‘Bindarray’ means ‘many creeks’ in the local Gumbaynggir language. The recently opened picnic area sits on the banks of the stunning, crystal-clear Urumbilun River which is perfect for a revitalising swim. Take a short walk through the rainforest to see beautiful Bangalore Falls. The pristine location can be reached from Ulong via Corfes Road or from Dairyville via Pine Road. Both are unpaved, dry-weather roads.

 

 

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Nana Glen is a picturesque rural village in the Orara Valley, west of Coffs Harbour. A tranquil picnic spot is waiting for you along the Orara River beside Grafton Street (which becomes Bucca Road further east towards the highway). Pack a picnic or buy some refreshments in town and settle down on the grass or at the picnic table in the little reserve, just 500m from the Orara Way/Grafton Street junction. Enjoy the peace and quiet of the river banks before continuing your exploration of Coffs Coast.


Much work has been done to the Pacific Highway making for a more enjoyable drive. Whenever driving long distances, driver fatigue should be avoided by sharing the driving and taking rest breaks every 2 hours. With breaks, Coffs Harbour is about a 6.5 hour drive from Sydney and about 5 hour drive from Brisbane. Busses arrive in Coffs Harbour regularly at the Bus Depot located on the the Pacific Highway and can offer a convenient, budget way of getting here. Most bus companies located on the east coast of Australia have a regular service to Coffs Harbour. There is a train station located in Coffs Harbour with daily services to and from Sydney and Brisbane.

Attractions
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Botanic Garden

Introduction

Hidden away in an area of scenic beauty and almost completely surrounded by Coffs Creek lies an area of diverse landscapes that hold a treasure trove of flora and fauna. Visitors can enjoy the relaxation of a quiet walk, the beauty of native or exotic plants, or the stimulation of learning about the environment in an outstanding Regional Botanic Garden and tourist attraction.

Maybe a quiet walk, a bush picnic, or an interest in birds is your specialty. Then while you're here in this beautiful area of the Coffs Coast, make some time to let time seem of less importance. Walk through the rainforests and mangroves, keep an eye out for koalas and birds and see exotic plants and trees from many countries.

Visit the North Coast Regional Botanic Garden in Coffs Harbour and absorb the relaxing peace offered by this ‘Oasis of Tranquility’.

 

The Garden is open 9am to 5pm every day of the year and entry is free

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Coffs Harbour Marina

Introduction

The old timber jetty in the harbour at Coffs is the place to promenade, sit and fish, photograph sunrise or to watch swimmers, seabirds, fishing boats, outrigger canoe paddlers and cruising yachts come and go.

 

At the adjacent marina, the fishing fleet and cruise boats go about their daily routine - landing fish or getting ready to venture out for more. Whale watch cruise boats in season (June to November) set out on their expeditions with excited passengers while other folk sip latte at the marina cafe or snack on fish & chips from the Fishermen's Co-op.

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Point Lookout

Introduction

At Point Lookout you are on the edge of the Great Dividing Range. The altitude is 1,563 metres (or 5,127 ft in the old scale). At this height, the climate is sub alpine. In summer the air is a refreshing change from the sub tropical breezes below. In winter the air is crisp and at times chilly so be sure to take your hat, coat and gloves.

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Promised Land

Introduction

You only need to look at the various place names on a map of Coffs Coast to locate one of our purest and most magical places of all - Promised Land. This tranquil part of the Bellinger Valley is rolling pastures of the greenest green you’ve ever seen. They are bordered by lush sub-tropical bushland and backed by the mountain escarpment of the Great Dividing Range in Dorrigo National Park. Promised Land starts at the township of Gleniffer, with a handful of houses and the Glennifer Hall and Church next to the Never Never Creek, 12km from Bellingen.

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South Solitary Island

Introduction

Lighthouse keepers and their families were used to living in remote locations, but even they regarded South Solitary Island as the most isolated place in NSW. South Solitary was hard to get to. Lying 18 km north-east of Coffs Harbour, and rising dramatically from the steep rocky landscape, the lighthouse was linked to a high jetty. When seas were calm, food and supplies were delivered using the jetty and basket lifts. 

The lighthouse and its cottages were built of concrete in 1880. Although the island cannot be visited, the lighthouse can be viewed by boat cruises from Coffs Harbour.

 

 

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Beaches & Waterways

Introduction

Coffs Coast is a 90km string of golden beaches washed by the Pacific Ocean surf. You can choose from wild, empty stretches bordering national park wilderness to patrolled, seaside beaches offering all the amenities you need.

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Headlands & Lookouts

Introduction

There is so much beauty to taken in on Coffs Coast. To appreciate the best of offer we have put together a list of the most popular headlands and look outs in the area.

 

 

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Picnic Spots

Introduction

Relax and take in the calm and breath taking landscapes and scenery of Coffs Coast. A picnic is the perfect way to unwind and let the stresses of the world slowly fade away in the horizon. Below are some of the popular picnic spots in the Coffs Coast area.

 

 

Location
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  • Destination
  • Attractions
  • Map
Description

Coffs Harbour – Gold Coast

Journey to Cape Byron Lighthouse for superb views from Australia’s eastern-most point over the Pacific Ocean.  Afterwards spend time discovering the relaxed bohemian vibe of Byron Bay. For lunch we recommend fresh fish and chips on the beach, there’s nothing more Australian. Continue to the famous holiday destination, the Gold Coast.

Novotel Surfers Paradise

Novotel Surfers Paradise is situated just minutes from the beach. Take in magnificent ocean or city skyline views from your private balcony from your well-appointed accommodation. Relax by the outdoor swimming pool, join friends for a glass of wine on our Level 5 Rooftop Bar or indulge in the spectacular seafood buffet at Hanlan's Restaurant. Novotel Surfers Paradise is located in the heart of Surfers Paradise with sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean, Cavill Mall, and the Gold Coast canals and hinterland.

Meals Included: Full buffet breakfast